This is a novel that takes a peek inside the secret world of an inventor’s mind— what he sees, how he thinks and how he conceives the inventions that help change the world.

The story is told as a series of flashbacks. The protagonist Saagar, a reclusive ‘genius’, widely acclaimed for his inventions and patents, goes down memory lane as he is being interviewed by a business magazine. Talking to the young interviewer, who virtually hero-worships him, Saagar remembers the people and events that shaped his mind, moulded his life and enabled his extraordinary achievements.

The flashback begins with Saagar harking back to his younger self as a precocious schoolboy who discovers that he cannot ask certain questions in his science class.  He may ask ‘How’ the laws of physics work, but he may not ask ‘Why’ they work. That arouses his curiosity, which soon develops into a passion for all things scientific.

Intrigued and challenged by this discovery, Saagar resolves that he will be the one who will figure out the Holy Grail of Physics—The Theory Of everything, which was the unfinished agenda of Einstein.

Saagar enters college with this avowed aim but life shows him its unpredictable nature and throws him into a loop, first plunging him head-first into the euphoria of first love and then completely changing his career path. The Theory of Everything, his childhood ambition, becomes a faint memory as he immerses himself in living a high-powered and superficially exciting life.

As the book progresses, Saagar discovers Love, Lust and Loss. He finds that the happiness and ego-boost he gets as he experiences wealth and success, are not necessarily the happiness he really seeks. He discovers that the goals that he believed would give him peace and happiness actually don’t. Life, he finds, can and will throw him a googly whenever it pleases, neatly foiling the ‘best laid plans of mice and men’! How can anyone be happy in such a situation he wonders to himself?

The breaking point comes when he loses someone with whom he had had a bitter-sweet relationship. That is a Gautama Buddha moment for the protagonist—an epiphany which forces him to question the very reasons for living. Suddenly Saagar sees his rock-solid world disappearing into a fog of unknowing, propelling him onto a completely new path—a path of self-discovery that he starts walking with an increasing focus and passion, of which he never knew he was capable.

That path leads him to all the things that he had desired, valued or aspired.  He ends up not only finding the logic of the Unified field—that soup of creation from which everything emerges—but he also ends up re-inventing his entire life: work, personal and creative, till he reaches his highest potential. He becomes a famous inventor.

And this is the journey that the reader of the book is invited to undertake, since the story of Saagar could be the story of any of us and by the end of the book, the reader acquires a sense, through the protagonist’s personal story, of what it means to know oneself and to know ‘Brahm’—creation as well.